Little Woods

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Available for

Virtual

In-person

Available for screenings until

Sep 01, 2022

Available for screenings in

United States of America

Brought to you By

Neon

About the film

For years, Ollie has illicitly helped the struggling residents of her North Dakota oil boomtown access Canadian health care and medication. When the authorities catch on, she plans to abandon her crusade, only to be dragged in even deeper after a desperate plea for help from her sister. From now until June 30th, every screening of 'Portrait of a Lady' booked will raise funds for the National Network of Abortion Funds. From now until August 30th, every screening of 'Little Woods' booked will raise funds for the the National Network of Abortion Funds.

Genre

Drama

Runtime

1h 45m

Released

2018

Director

Nia DaCosta

Cast

Lily James, Tessa Thompson, Luke Kirby

Upcoming screenings

Awards & recognition

Denver International Film Festival

Winner American Independent Award

Fargo Film Festival

Winner Best Narrative Feature

Gasparilla International Film Festival

Winner Best Performance

Heartland Film

Winner Truly Moving Picture Award

Our take

NEON is proud to channel this powerful story of family and love to support The National Network of Abortion Funds and the 80+ organizations they represent. Book a live virtual or in person screening, and choose to donate through an upfront fee or by selling tickets. 90% of all fees will go to the organization of your choice courtesy of NEON. After your screening we will follow up to confirm where you want your donation to go.

What people are saying

Less relentlessly bleak than Winter's Bone, which along with Frozen River is an obvious inspiration here, the life-on-the-margins drama makes a fine, tense vehicle for Tessa Thompson, who in the last few years has stood out in a variety of genres.

John DeFore

The Hollywood Reporter

Under DaCosta’s sure, steady direction, Little Woods belongs with movies like “Frozen River” (2008), “Winter’s Bone” (2010), “Wind River” (2017), and last year’s “Leave No Trace” — dramas about overlooked communities that ache with empathetic detail. The movie steers clear of polemics, though, and puts its faith in its characters, specifically the exhausted, unbreakable bond of sisterhood that unites these siblings.

Ty Burr

Boston Globe

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